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Entertainment

Who doesn’t enjoy being entertained? Certainly no one we know… Perhaps that’s why many people say we Boomers were the first consumer generation, and point out that we grew up in the television age, watching and being entertained by what came to be called ‘mass media’ from the comfort of our living rooms? Who doesn’t remember watching Captain Kangaroo, seeing their first Beatles performance on the Ed Sullivan Show, and the early – must watch – nights of Saturday Night Live?

Of course, as we grew up, we changed movies, too. Think of 1967’s ‘The Graduate,” 1969’s ‘Easy Rider,’ The Godfather (1972) and ‘Apocalypse Now’ (1979). Not to mention ‘All the President’s Men’ (1976). And who could forget ‘Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid’ (1969), ‘MASH’ (1970), ‘Jaws’ (1975) and even ‘Summer of 42’ (1971) or ‘The Way We Were’ (1973) or… what about all the movies featuring The Beatles?

A recent Raymond James-penned article we read in The Atlantic claims that we are now reclaiming the world of pop culture. Whether or not that’s true, we love that we can still see Bruce Springsteen, James Taylor, Fleetwood Mac and even the Rolling Stones on tour. And catch television programs like ‘Only Murders in the Building,’ starring old favorites Steve Martin, Martin Short with guest appearances by old favorites like Shirley MacLaine, Nathan Lane and Sting – Baby Boomers all!

Since we’re living longer and healthier lives, we are still able to continue reshaping our world – and the entertainment available to us — as we have done since we took our first breaths. As Judy Dench says in ‘The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel,’ “This is a new and different world, the challenge is to cope with it, and not just cope but thrive.”

Of course, there are other more active forms of entertainment we’re enjoying, such as playing Pickleball, kayaking, and even participating in marathon races. We’ll try to run the gamut here…

Latest In Entertainment

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Arms Up to Heaven (Movie Review: To The Moon)

I need to give you a little bit of background about how we do things around these parts. I’m privileged because the site I write for allows me to write about anything I want. Nobody has ever said, “Hey, how about not so much of this MCU nonsense?” Nobody has ever DMd me and proclai…I need to give you a little bit of background about how we do things around these parts. I’m privileged because the site I write for allows me to write about anything I want. Nobody has ever sai…I need to give you a little bit of background about how we do things around these parts. I’m privileged because the site I write for allows me to write about anything I want. Nobody has ever said, “Hey, how about not so much of this MCU nonsense?” Nobody has ever DMd me and proclaimed, “You will no longer write about horror movies if you know what’s good for you.” I’m grateful for that.  Despite having free reign to cover whatever strikes my fancy, I think it’s important to have some variety. It’s not only the spice of life, it’s the spice of film criticism. You don’t need me writing about superhero movies over and over and over. Neither do I, for that matter, As a result, I try to keep things interesting. I’m not…

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Michael Myers in the Multiverse of Madness (Movie Review: Halloween Ends)

Over time, audiences have been trained to regard franchises a certain way. The understanding is that everything is connected, and a plot point or character that’s introduced will be paid off in a later installment. Look at the MCU. When a person or concept is brought up, those in the know smil…Over time, audiences have been trained to regard franchises a certain way. The understanding is that everything is connected, and a plot point or character that’s introduced will be paid off in …Over time, audiences have been trained to regard franchises a certain way. The understanding is that everything is connected, and a plot point or character that’s introduced will be paid off in a later installment. Look at the MCU. When a person or concept is brought up, those in the know smile and think, “They’re really going to do something cool with that two to six years down the road!” It wasn’t always that way. Studios got into the habit of treating sequels as “the same, but more” as the original. Die Hard II is basically the same movie as Die Hard, only not as good. If they weren’t doing that, the studios focused on standalone installments. Until recently, James Bond movies had very little connective narrative tissue. You would think, &…

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A Journalist of Some Repute (Movie Review: Confess, Fletch)

I’m fond, perhaps too much, of saying that two things can be true at the same time. The first thing is that attempting to reboot a long-dormant franchise is foolish. Nobody is clamoring for a revival of Francis the Talking Mule. Millions of people online aren’t pestering studio bigwigs f…I’m fond, perhaps too much, of saying that two things can be true at the same time. The first thing is that attempting to reboot a long-dormant franchise is foolish. Nobody is clamoring for a re…I’m fond, perhaps too much, of saying that two things can be true at the same time. The first thing is that attempting to reboot a long-dormant franchise is foolish. Nobody is clamoring for a revival of Francis the Talking Mule. Millions of people online aren’t pestering studio bigwigs for an updated Ma and Pa Kettle. Some things, once cinematically dead, should stay dead. So it was for the Fletch franchise. At least, I thought so. Long, long ago, Chevy Chase was one of the world’s biggest stars. 1987’s Fletch was a solid hit for him, and understandably so. It’s Chase’s favorite film of his, and it’s a solid comedy/mystery. 1989’s Fletch Lives is not. It’s profoundly half-assed, and that lack of care put the franchise into a coma. There…

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Revenge Is Like a River (Movie Review: Saloum)

I’ve seen enough American movies to know what they look and feel like. Odds are you’re the same way. Whether you’ve seen an A24 horror film, an entry in the MCU, or a prestige Oscar contender, you have a pretty good sense of the expected beats. That doesn’t mean that every fi…I’ve seen enough American movies to know what they look and feel like. Odds are you’re the same way. Whether you’ve seen an A24 horror film, an entry in the MCU, or a prestige Oscar …I’ve seen enough American movies to know what they look and feel like. Odds are you’re the same way. Whether you’ve seen an A24 horror film, an entry in the MCU, or a prestige Oscar contender, you have a pretty good sense of the expected beats. That doesn’t mean that every film released in this country is predictable, but what it does mean is that American movies are generally made with American sensibilities in mind. There’s a vast and fascinating world of cinema beyond our borders, and one of the most fun aspects is to gauge how those foreign sensibilities are both different and similar to what we’ve got here. It’s not always a slam dunk, though. I was not terribly into the French psychedelic horror drama Lux Aeterna. Is it because I’m a ca…

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Strigberger’s Latest Book ‘Boomers, Zoomers and Other Oomers’ Will Have You Laughing Over the Dread “A Word:” Aging

Title: Boomers, Zoomers, and Other Oomers: A Boomer-biased Irreverent Perspective on Aging  Author: Marcel Strigberger ISBN-10#:0995950121 Reviewed for the NABBW by Anne Holmes Canadian author Marcel Strigberger says he is a humorist trapped inside the body of a former litigation lawyer. You might…Title: Boomers, Zoomers, and Other Oomers: A Boomer-biased Irreverent Perspective on Aging  Author: Marcel Strigberger ISBN-10#:0995950121 Reviewed for the NABBW by Anne Holmes Canadian author Marce…Title: Boomers, Zoomers, and Other Oomers: A Boomer-biased Irreverent Perspective on Aging  Author: Marcel Strigberger ISBN-10#:0995950121 Reviewed for the NABBW by Anne Holmes Canadian author Marcel Strigberger says he is a humorist trapped inside the body of a former litigation lawyer. You might think that is a unique resume starter, and you’d be correct. I’m pretty sure I don’t know of any other retired attorneys who can say that they have also worked as a stand-up comedian, sharing the stage with big-name humorists like Howie Mandel, Bob Saget and Jim Carrey. Although (sidebar here) my sister’s godfather, a retired judge from sparsely populated northern Wisconsin, used to entertain family and friends with memorable humorous comments during times when he was not sitting on th…

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Wish You Could Improve Your Mobility Without Pain Or Injury? The Book ‘Stretching for 50+’ Shows You How to Succeed

Title: Stretching for 50+: A Customized Program for Increasing Flexibility, Avoiding Injury and Enjoying an Active Lifestyle, 2nd Edition Author: Dr. Karl Knopf ISBN-10#: 1612436714 Reviewed for the NABBW by Anne Holmes This slim, 128-page book is designed for people who know that health and fitn…Title: Stretching for 50+: A Customized Program for Increasing Flexibility, Avoiding Injury and Enjoying an Active Lifestyle, 2nd Edition Author: Dr. Karl Knopf ISBN-10#: 1612436714 Reviewed for the…Title: Stretching for 50+: A Customized Program for Increasing Flexibility, Avoiding Injury and Enjoying an Active Lifestyle, 2nd Edition Author: Dr. Karl Knopf ISBN-10#: 1612436714 Reviewed for the NABBW by Anne Holmes This slim, 128-page book is designed for people who know that health and fitness  are only achieved by staying active and doing as many good things for themselves as they can, says its Introduction. Most of us Boomers were taught a number of outdated fitness rules that could actually cause us more hard than good, says the author, who explains that it is not so much about “more exercise is better,” it’s actually about balance and flexibility. About training smart, not hard. With regard to balance, “Dr. Karl” means: Stretch what is tight and strengthen what i…

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‘Core Strength for 50+’ Author Says Your Core is Critical to Mobility, But You Won’t Need a Gym Membership to Achieve It

Title: Core Strength for 50+: A Customized Program for Safely Toning Ab, Back, and Oblique Muscles Author: Dr. Karl Knopf ISBN-10#: 978-1-612-43101-7 Reviewed for the NABBW by Anne Holmes From swinging a pickle ball paddle to lifting and toting a grandchild, or even hauling a bag of groceries, yo…Title: Core Strength for 50+: A Customized Program for Safely Toning Ab, Back, and Oblique Muscles Author: Dr. Karl Knopf ISBN-10#: 978-1-612-43101-7 Reviewed for the NABBW by Anne Holmes From swin…Title: Core Strength for 50+: A Customized Program for Safely Toning Ab, Back, and Oblique Muscles Author: Dr. Karl Knopf ISBN-10#: 978-1-612-43101-7 Reviewed for the NABBW by Anne Holmes From swinging a pickle ball paddle to lifting and toting a grandchild, or even hauling a bag of groceries, your core strength is everything. Balance, agility and youthful stature are just a few of the benefits of a toned and powerful midsection. This handy paperback book, Core Strength for 50+,  has everything you need to: • Improve your posture • Enhance your athletic performance • Keep your low back strong and pain-free • Avoid injury This book is worth owning. Whether you are working alone or with a partner, it lays out a plan for improving mobility, flexibility, balance, and tone while r…

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Jan Cullinane’s Latest Edition of ‘The New Retirement’ Is Like Having a Sage Life Coach on Speed Dial

Title: The New Retirement: The Ultimate Guide to the Rest of Your Life   Author: Jan Cullinane (Foreward by Kerry Hannon) ISBN-10: 978-1-119-83815-9  Reviewed for the NABBW by Anne Holmes This the third edition of Jan Cullinane’s seminal work, and as Kerry Hannon says in her foreword, “(Th…Title: The New Retirement: The Ultimate Guide to the Rest of Your Life   Author: Jan Cullinane (Foreward by Kerry Hannon) ISBN-10: 978-1-119-83815-9  Reviewed for the NABBW by Anne Holmes This t…Title: The New Retirement: The Ultimate Guide to the Rest of Your Life   Author: Jan Cullinane (Foreward by Kerry Hannon) ISBN-10: 978-1-119-83815-9  Reviewed for the NABBW by Anne Holmes This the third edition of Jan Cullinane’s seminal work, and as Kerry Hannon says in her foreword, “(This book) is a persuasive reminder that Retirement is vastly different today than in previous generations, and (it) will continue to mutate.” As I write this review, we are living in a time of rampant inflation, post-Covid, when everything – especially food and medical care – costs more, and when according to the Fidelity Retiree Home Health Care Cost Estimate, an average retired couple age 65 probably needs to have saved approximately $300,000 (after tax) just to cover Healthcare expenses…

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